In my previous blogpost I recorded that William Buckle and his small family emigrated to Australia in 1842.

They sailed on the “Royal Saxon”.

I’ve now found out that the “Royal Saxon” departed London on the 19 June 1842 sailing to Launceston in Van Diemen’s Land (Tasmania) via Tristan Da Cunha arriving on 22 November 1842. A journey of 5 months! (See Australian Brickhills.)

The British Newspaper Archive has a copy of the Cork Examiner June 1842 which has an announcement about free passages to Australia and who to contact for more information. I can only speculate that there was a similar promotion in a newspaper nearer to Pickhill.

Cork Examiner – Monday 06 June 1842
Image © THE BRITISH LIBRARY BOARD. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

A previous sailing of the “Royal Saxon” resulted in all the newly arrived emigrants finding work within twenty four hours. Which presumably happened for William Buckle judging by his subsequent success.

Cork Examiner – Friday 14 April 1843
Image © THE BRITISH LIBRARY BOARD. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

And the standards of care for the passengers of the “Royal Saxon” seems to have been of the highest from both the captain and the surgeon on board. Even though they don’t appear to have been able to do anything for baby John Buckle who died during the voyage.

Southern Reporter and Cork Commercial Courier – Saturday 13 August 1842
Image © THE BRITISH LIBRARY BOARD. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

The “Royal Saxon” was built in Liverpool in 1829. The ship carried cargo and passengers to India, Australia and the Far East.

In 1839 the “Royal Saxon” attempted to violate a Royal Navy blockade of Canton and inadvertently became the direct cause of the Battle of Chuenpi and consequently the First Opium War.

Miller [Public domain] Wikicommons

The ship escaped the blockade and continued to trade. Between 1841 and 1844 the “Royal Saxon” was used specifically to transport colonists to Australia. Her career is believed to have ended in 1857 by which time, William Buckle owned the “Rifle Ranges Station” and had already opened the “Digby Hotel” near Digby in South West Victoria, Australia. William’s decision to take a free passage for himself and his family on the “Royal Saxon” in 1842 was certainly a good one.